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The Cultural Power of Cinema is the latest edition of Digital Cinema Media’s Building Box Office Brands series, created in partnership with experts, Burst Your Bubble. The study reveals cinema’s leading role in co-viewing experiences (98 percent) and how brands using the medium can in turn maximize commercial and social impact.
»POSTED on July 8, 2024
The Cultural Power of Cinema is the latest edition of Digital Cinema Media’s Building Box Office Brands series, created in partnership with experts, Burst Your Bubble. The study reveals cinema’s leading role in co-viewing experiences (98 percent) and how brands using the medium can in turn maximize commercial and social impact.

Features

Having previously employed another industry recognized theatre management system, Cinema West Theatres encountered numerous weekly challenges, including excessive time dedicated to content management, subpar performance, and frequent loss of shows resulting in revenue loss. Recognizing the need for change, senior management sought a better solution. Cinema West Thrives with AAM Screenwriter
»POSTED on May 29, 2024
Having previously employed another industry recognized theatre management system, Cinema West Theatres encountered numerous weekly challenges, including excessive time dedicated to content management, subpar performance, and frequent loss of shows resulting in revenue loss. Recognizing the need for change, senior management sought a better solution. Following a successful trial of Arts Alliance Media’s Screenwriter at Palladio 16 and Palladio Luxe, their most prominent, multi-format location, in 2022, Cinema West proceeded to implement Arts Alliance Media’s flagship theatre management software across their entire circuit, resulting in substantial time savings, decreased revenue loss, and a notable reduction in support tickets; each contributing towards an improved experience and healthier, more sustainable business.
Created by showrunner Abe Sylvia, the Apple TV+ comedic drama Palm Royale navigates the tale of one woman's ambitious journey to make it among the upper crust, through extravagant settings that evoke the golden era of Life magazine. Cinematographer David Lanzenberg was behind the camera for the first two episodes, working with director Tate Taylor, and then passed the baton to fellow director of photography Todd McMullen, who shot the remaining eight episodes. Creating the Palette of Palm Royale
»POSTED on May 27, 2024
Created by showrunner Abe Sylvia, the Apple TV+ comedic drama Palm Royale navigates the tale of one woman's ambitious journey to make it among the upper crust, through extravagant settings that evoke the golden era of Life magazine. Cinematographer David Lanzenberg was behind the camera for the first two episodes, working with director Tate Taylor, and then passed the baton to fellow director of photography Todd McMullen, who shot the remaining eight episodes. With support from Panavision Woodland Hills, the cinematographers opted to pair Panaspeed large-format spherical primes with the Millennium DXL2 camera. Here, the collaborators highlight how the series’ visual language was distinctly enhanced by the choices made by the art, wardrobe, and hair & make-up departments.
Now streaming on Netflix, Good Grief marks the feature-film directorial debut of Daniel Levy, well known as the co-creator and costar of the series Schitt’s Creek. Offering an uplifting perspective on dealing with the permanence of losing a loved one, Good Grief follows Marc (played by Levy), who was content living in the shadow of his larger-than-life husband, Oliver (Luke Evans). Crafting a Visual Language for Grief
»POSTED on May 6, 2024
Now streaming on Netflix, Good Grief marks the feature-film directorial debut of Daniel Levy, well known as the co-creator and costar of the series Schitt’s Creek. Offering an uplifting perspective on dealing with the permanence of losing a loved one, Good Grief follows Marc (played by Levy), who was content living in the shadow of his larger-than-life husband, Oliver (Luke Evans). But when Oliver unexpectedly dies, Marc’s world shatters, sending him and his two best friends, Sophie (Ruth Negga) and Thomas (Himesh Patel), on a soul-searching trip to Paris that reveals some hard truths they each needed to face. Cinematographer Ole Bratt Birkeland, BSC and gaffer Chris Dowling made each of their decisions with the aim of embracing these realities. Panavision London supplied the production’s camera and lens package, and Panalux London provided lighting services. The filmmakers also worked with Light Iron for dailies and finishing services, including visual effects and final color. Light Iron’s VFX contributions included 3D tracking, reflection maps, motion vector mapping, rotoscoping, paint, and multi-layered compositing; in the final grade, Birkeland reteamed with supervising colorist Ian Vertovec. Supported throughout production and post, the filmmakers were free to skillfully explore the bright spots of bereavement. Here, Birkeland and Dowling discuss their approach to crafting the film’s visual language.
The first feature film from writer-director Shaun Seneviratne, Ben and Suzanne: A Reunion in 4 Parts depicts the struggle between love and duty as Ben (Sathya Sridharan) steps out on a limb to rekindle his relationship with Suzanne (Anastasia Olowin), who can’t escape the calls of her work. Seeking to make a film that felt grittier than the manicured qualities typically associated with romantic comedies, Seneviratne decided to employ non-actors in every role except the leads. Creating a Cinema Verité Look
»POSTED on April 29, 2024
The first feature film from writer-director Shaun Seneviratne, Ben and Suzanne: A Reunion in 4 Parts depicts the struggle between love and duty as Ben (Sathya Sridharan) steps out on a limb to rekindle his relationship with Suzanne (Anastasia Olowin), who can’t escape the calls of her work. Seeking to make a film that felt grittier than the manicured qualities typically associated with romantic comedies, Seneviratne decided to employ non-actors in every role except the leads. Complementing the decisions Seneviratne made in prep and on set with cinematographer Molly Scotti, Light Iron colorist Keith Jenson helped fine-tune the visual language in the final color grade, which took place at Light Iron New York ahead of the movie’s world premiere at the 2024 SXSW Film Festival. Here, Seneviratne and Jenson share their perspectives on their memorable collaboration.
Directed by Héléna Klotz, La Vénus d'argent (aka Spirit of Ecstasy) tells the story of Jeanne Francoeur (played by Claire Pommet), a young woman striving to escape the circumstances of her birth by morphing into a silent predator in the world of investment banking. Working with Panavision Paris, cinematographer Victor Seguin, AFC employed PVintage and Primo 70 lenses and a Panavised Sony Venice camera to help visualize Jeanne’s contrasting environments. A Spirit Between Worlds
»POSTED on April 22, 2024
Directed by Héléna Klotz, La Vénus d'argent (aka Spirit of Ecstasy) tells the story of Jeanne Francoeur (played by Claire Pommet), a young woman striving to escape the circumstances of her birth by morphing into a silent predator in the world of investment banking. Working with Panavision Paris, cinematographer Victor Seguin, AFC employed PVintage and Primo 70 lenses and a Panavised Sony Venice camera to help visualize Jeanne’s contrasting environments. Here, Seguin shares his experiences collaborating with Klotz and finding a unique look for each of Jeanne's worlds.
The music video for Ariana Grande’s yes, and? brings a modern approach to vintage allure. The video was directed by Christian Breslauer, who worked for the first time with cinematographer Gaul Porat. Together, the filmmakers found inspiration in well-chosen references and showcased the dynamic choreography with intentional framing and subtle, deliberate camera moves. Working with Panavision New York, Breslauer and Porat chose to work primarily with H Series spherical prime lenses. Creating a Vintage Allure
»POSTED on March 25, 2024
The music video for Ariana Grande’s yes, and? brings a modern approach to vintage allure. The video was directed by Christian Breslauer, who worked for the first time with cinematographer Gaul Porat. Together, the filmmakers found inspiration in well-chosen references and showcased the dynamic choreography with intentional framing and subtle, deliberate camera moves. Working with Panavision New York, Breslauer and Porat chose to work primarily with H Series spherical primes for the production, which came together quickly late last year. Here the two filmmakers share insights on their inspirations and collaboration.

News

The Hoyts Group has installed an improved and fully immersive, connected cinema experience,... Read More

Alamo Drafthouse Cinema has announced that all of its Dallas-Fort Worth cinemas will be reopened... Read More

Cinema exhibitor PVR Inox has reported a widening of consolidated net loss to Rs 179 crore in... Read More

Studio Ghibli’s animated film, My Neighbour Totoro, from director Hayao Miyazaki (Spirited Away... Read More