Technicolor

The Artistry of Jungle Book: Part 5

Fri, 03/03/2017 - 11:28 -- Nick Dager

Director Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book won this year’s Oscar for Best Visual Effects. A Walt Disney Picture, the movie is unique because the only live action character, the boy Mowgli, was shot on bluescreen while everything else was computer-generated. The visual effects team included key talent from Technicolor and its subsidiary, the Moving Picture Company. In the final part of our five-part series, Tim Sarnoff, president of production services and deputy CEO at Technicolor, explains how Technicolor tackled this unique project, and what it means for future of increasingly complex and immersive productions.

The Artistry of Jungle Book: Part 4

Thu, 03/02/2017 - 11:08 -- Nick Dager

Director Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book won this year’s Oscar for Best Visual Effects. A Walt Disney Picture, the movie is unique because the only live action character, the boy Mowgli, was shot on bluescreen while everything else was computer-generated. The visual effects team included key talent from Technicolor and its subsidiary, the Moving Picture Company. In part four of our five-part series, Steven J. Scott, Technicolor’s vice president of theatrical imaging and supervising and finishing artist in Los Angeles, talks about his experience working with Legato and other artists in the making of The Jungle Book.

The Artistry of Jungle Book: Part 3

Wed, 03/01/2017 - 13:22 -- Nick Dager

Director Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book won this year’s Oscar for Best Visual Effects. A Walt Disney Picture, the movie is unique because the only live action character, the boy Mowgli, was shot on bluescreen while everything else was computer-generated. The visual effects team included key talent from Technicolor and its subsidiary, the Moving Picture Company. In part three of our five-part series, Rob Legato lead VFX supervisor, and second unit director on The Jungle Book explains how creating a movie that was totally dependent on VFX demanded a completely different approach to production, and opened the door to a greatly expanded role for VFX in real-world movie-making.

The Artistry of Jungle Book: Part 2

Tue, 02/28/2017 - 11:38 -- Nick Dager

Director Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book won this year’s Oscar for Best Visual Effects. A Walt Disney Picture, the movie is unique because the only live action character, the boy Mowgli, was shot on bluescreen while everything else was computer-generated. The visual effects team included key talent from Technicolor and its subsidiary, the Moving Picture Company. In part two of our five-part series, MPC chief technology officer Damien Fagnou describes some of challenges and complexities presented in producing this daunting artistic and technological undertaking.

The Artistry of Jungle Book: Part 1

Mon, 02/27/2017 - 13:33 -- Nick Dager

Director Jon Favreau’s The Jungle Book won this year’s Oscar for Best Visual Effects. A Walt Disney Picture, the movie is unique because the only live action character, the boy Mowgli, was shot on bluescreen while everything else was computer-generated. The visual effects team included key talent from Technicolor and its subsidiary, the Moving Picture Company. In part one of our five-part series, Adam Valdez, visual effects supervisor with MPC explains how teamwork, talent and a pursuit of excellence combined to create a movie that has been widely acclaimed for its artistic and technological accompaniments.

Technicolor Starts Second Century

Tue, 05/17/2016 - 15:02 -- Nick Dager

Throughout its century in business, Technicolor, the well-known production and post-production house, has worked on features, episodics, and marketing material across the content scale from major studio productions to award-winning independents. More recently, Technicolor has been leading the topic of High Dynamic Range through many outlets including the foundation of the UHD Alliance. Its services range from color grading, mastering services, VFX and final delivery, all of which have now incorporated HDR content.

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